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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
What really is the difference between the four models..

Icon is the cheapest..

and the other three..but what do you get for the 1500 dollar more..

is it all cosmetics.? is the bar, the seat, the fenders and the colors? obviously the seat had more work..

i wish they would make a chart like the car dealers do.. i visited the showroom last saturday.. the sales man was kinda helpfull but did not know much the crazy little details..

Can someone here put something up or talk about this?

thanks
Lemonhead
 

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The differences are mostly cosmetic with these "functional" exceptions:

-Full Throttle has a different exhaust (that also sounds different)
-Full Throttle has lower bars
-There are 3 different seats between the 4 bikes, varying in shape and finish
-Classic has a full rear fender (protects better from rear wheel spray)
-Spoked wheels on Classic and Urban Enduro run tubes and are heavier than cast wheels w/tubeless tires on Icon and Full Throttle
-Urban Enduro comes standard with headlight grille (may protect against debris as headlight lens in glass)

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Color and side panels are the main differences.
  • Icon — red or yellow, cast wheels
  • Urban Enduro — high fender, spoked wheels, headlight guard, brown seat
  • Full Throttle — short fender, cast wheels, sport tail, dual pipe exhaust, sporty seat, lower tapered bars
  • Classic — aluminum fenders, spoked wheels, (fake?) leather seat
Bang for your buck goes to the Icon. UE and Classic you're paying for spoked wheels. FT you're paying for the exhaust + bars.

Note: the spoked wheels are tubed, which some people didn't realize or like.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thats what stopping me.. i dont like the idea of inner tubes..

the the spocks are more expensive in real life? i was just going to get an icon.. but not thrilled on the color sceme..



i really like the orange and brown seat.. really looks vintage..

so where is the 1500 dollars go?? mostly the wheels?




Lemon
 

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Discussion Starter #6
From what I know...if you have a inner tube and catch a nail..give it 5 min and your done.."flat".. Is this true? Does the full trolle have more power because of the exhaust? Or is it just louder. ? Icon is starting to look attractive all of a sudden..
Loud is not me now a days..
Lemon
 

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From what I know...if you have a inner tube and catch a nail..give it 5 min and your done.."flat".. Is this true? Does the full trolle have more power because of the exhaust? Or is it just louder. ? Icon is starting to look attractive all of a sudden..
Loud is not me now a days..
Lemon
If you get a nail, whether it's a tube or tubeless you're going to go flat in five minutes. The method of fixing flats with tubes and no tubes is different, and each camp has its pros and cons. But for most road riding, the reliability of tubes vs tubeless isn't really an issue. Both will work for all but the most extreme of rider applications, but generally riders on-road prefer mag/non-spoke wheels for the extra stability and off-road riders like spokes for a bit more flexibility on bumpy roads.

The FT can is definitely louder, but I couldn't answer whether it gives more power. It probably flows better than stock, but I've yet to see a dyno of the Termi vs Icon cans and horsepower.

Icon is a great place to start, and you're saving $1500 right off the bat. If you want a certain look, whether it be stickers or side panels or fenders, those can be purchased with that extra cash and you still have left over cash for gas. The only time I'd go for any of the non-Icons is if the aesthetics appeal to you, like if you want the spoked wheels or the Termi exhaust (both of which are $1500+ alone). You'll still probably want to do a few mods to the bike anyway (many folks want need suspension or seats no matter which model they get as these are "sore" points to the Scrambler), so keep that in mind when you make your decision.
 

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If you get a nail, whether it's a tube or tubeless you're going to go flat in five minutes. The method of fixing flats with tubes and no tubes is different, and each camp has its pros and cons.
Yep, flat in 5 minutes. I got a screw in my Icon's rear tire about 1000 miles ago in the parking lot at work. I noticed the hissing immediately and rode it down to the side of the building where we have an air compressor and parked it. It was flat in 5 minutes.

A quick inspection revealed it was right in the center of a lug, about half way to the edge of the tread. I grabbed a ride to the nearest store with a coworker and picked up a tire plug kit. From there it took me less than 5 minutes to plug the hole and air my tire up.

I let it sit all day, and when I went to leave work it still had the same PSI. 1000 miles later it's still going strong. I know some people don't like plugs, but they are incredibly effective and reliable if the puncture is in the correct part of the tire.

My work is 35 miles from my house. This would have been a huge PITA, and would have cost me about $100 (I'm guessing) to fix if it was a tubed tire. Instead, it was a minor inconvenience and a $5 plug kit. I'm quite happy I don't have tubes for that reason alone.
 

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With a nail in a tube it will flatten almost immediately. The air rushes out of the tube and out of all the spoke holes rapidly.
Sometimes in a tubeless if you leave the nail in it'll hardly flatten at all. I rode from London to Somerset knowingly with a nail in the rear once. I wouldn't recommend this though, I just had to on that day.
I've used plugs like anotherhobby describes, and then ridden those tyres for thousands of miles and up to 148mph,on a Mille R,with total confidence. They're easy to do at the roadside when touring. You just need a couple of gas cans to reinflate.Doing a tubed tyre is "tiresome" in contrast. I wonder if that is where the word comes from?
It was a significant reason why i bought the Icon rather than a Classic. I can paint it orange and fit a brown seat and still save money.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
ok that pretty much answered my question.. i mean this is my first real bike.. the vespa is doing a fine job.. but it is a scooter.. i just wished it was like porsche where you can order up your car the way you want it.. if it was me..id order the classic with Icon wheels.. or a better yet full throttle with the classic color. which is only the tank..

am i asking too much?


Lemonhead.
 

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A couple things:

Firstly, my dealer was willing to work with me and customize a Classic that was in-stock and eat some of the cost just to get me out the door with a bike ASAP. I chose to wait for my UE, but that's always an option.

Secondly, I would actually say that the Urban Enduro is probably the best "bang for your buck" of all the bikes. You get quite a lot for the $1500 increase:
  • Headlight grill
  • Skid Plate
  • Cross-bar on the handlebars (adds stiffness, gives mounting point for bag or whatever)
  • Spoked wheels (if that's what you're into)
  • FRP Front Fender (more durable)
  • More comfortable seat
If you add all that up, it's a better deal than a "meh" Termignoni exhaust or an extended fender.
 

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Tubed or tubeless, the tires are easy to repair. People ride both styles of bikes around the world and make it home. Tubeless are faster to fix with a plug, but you sort of want to pull the tire off of the wheel to patch it correctly (ideally.) Tubed you fix like a bicycle. Pull the inner tube out where the leak is, scuff it up, use rubber cement and a rubber patch and put the tube back in. It's not a big deal other than breaking the bead of the tire from the rim.

As for the price of the bikes, if you really have your heart set on spoked wheels, a specific color, accessories... it might be financially wise to buy the specialty packages over the Icon. I liked red best as well as alloy wheels, so lucky me.
 

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thats what stopping me.. i dont like the idea of inner tubes..

the the spocks are more expensive in real life? i was just going to get an icon.. but not thrilled on the color sceme..



i really like the orange and brown seat.. really looks vintage..

so where is the 1500 dollars go?? mostly the wheels?




Lemon
yeah same thing here the classic as the name implies has that vintage look
when I saw the icon that yellow did not look that great to me I did not fall in love with that color
 

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I'm thinking about picking up a new Classic tomorrow. I've got a question about the weight and handling characteristics between the models with spoke wheels versus the alloy wheels. I know the spoke wheel, tire and tube is heavier than the alloy rim with the tubeless tire. Unsprung weight can significantly effect handling characteristics and also acceleration. If anyone out there has had the opportunity to ride both versions can you tell me if you noticed any difference in the way the bikes handled.? Also, does anyone know the difference in weight in the wheel and tire package on these bikes. I have been searching and have been unable to find anything.
 
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