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For the guys in colder climates. When storing the bike for winter, do you bother or should I bother changing the oil if it’s only got 2000 kilometres on it? I just don’t want to waste oil if I don’t have to.
 

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In 16 years I have always kept 1 of my bikes off the road over winter and never changed the oil unless it was time too...never had any issues
 

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Never done it. I plan on changing the oil and filter after the winter is over. The oil in it has about 6000 km on it.
Put the tank full of gas without ethanol if possible or ad a stabilizer.
I will also have the brake and clutch fluid refreshed after the winter as it darkens like hell on these bikes.
 

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My logic says that when winter sets in:

-Add fuel stabilizer to half tank or less of gas

When winter is over:

-Flush brake fluid if looking grungy
-Do oil change if feeling spritely
-Be the first rider on the road for the season

What did I mess up?
 

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My logic says that when winter sets in:

-Add fuel stabilizer to half tank or less of gas

When winter is over:

-Flush brake fluid if looking grungy
-Do oil change if feeling spritely
-Be the first rider on the road for the season

What did I mess up?
I always thought that it was best to keep the fuell tank as full as posible all the time when your not riding it(to prevent condensation).

For the rest it sounds fine. All depends on how and how long you are going to store your bike. I never go without a ride for longer then 2 months so I do nothing but fuell up and keep the chain nice and greasy. Then before the real season starts I change the oil and filter.
 

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For the guys in colder climates. When storing the bike for winter, do you bother or should I bother changing the oil if it’s only got 2000 kilometres on it? I just don’t want to waste oil if I don’t have to.
I never changed the oil till Spring of the next riding season - done that for sports bikes, cruisers and now my naked bike. Just fuel stabilizer, kept covered and battery removed. This has worked for me in Boston for the last 20 years without issues.
 

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I always thought that it was best to keep the fuell tank as full as posible all the time when your not riding it(to prevent condensation).

For the rest it sounds fine. All depends on how and how long you are going to store your bike. I never go without a ride for longer then 2 months so I do nothing but fuell up and keep the chain nice and greasy. Then before the real season starts I change the oil and filter.
I'm not sure where the moisture would come from?

I've put a few vehicles into long term storage (once 3 years, another 1 year plus) and each time the storage instructions were very clear on 1/4 tank of gas or less upon dropoff. And when I picked them up they were not full.
 

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I'm not sure where the moisture would come from?
Condensation comes from moisture in the air condensating on the cold steel tank inner walls mainly caused by temp changes throughout the day, the condensation then collects in the bottom of the tank creating rust which munches away at the steelwork. Proven by the amount of classic bikes (and cars) with holes in the bottom of the fuel tank.
It's well known and good practice to fill the fuel tank and maybe add a fuel stabiliser before long term storage. Or, drain the system completely. I don't agree with draining a once used system as the seals and hoses can go hard. Long term storage managed by people who know specifically vehicles could be different from general storage companies.
 

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Condensation comes from moisture in the air condensating on the cold steel tank inner walls mainly caused by temp changes throughout the day, the condensation then collects in the bottom of the tank creating rust which munches away at the steelwork. Proven by the amount of classic bikes (and cars) with holes in the bottom of the fuel tank.
It's well known and good practice to fill the fuel tank and maybe add a fuel stabiliser before long term storage. Or, drain the system completely. I don't agree with draining a once used system as the seals and hoses can go hard. Long term storage managed by people who know specifically vehicles could be different from general storage companies.
I figured there is some moisture in the remaining tank air but didn't know there was enough to condense and replace the fuel at the base of the tank in any significant quantity. And I figured those rust holes came from outside, not inside. My vehicles have always come back fine. Maybe temperature regulation is part of a good storage plan.
 

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Fuel tanks constantly breath as do engine crankcases. there is a valve in the fuel cap to let air in as the fuel level drops, the same valve will pressure release as the fuel warms up and expands.
As a side note, those who overfill their tank and leave it sitting full from cold underground storage and don't leave room for expansion ie. Ullage, they will find it overflowing and or flooding the Evap canister as the fuel heats up in the sun.
 

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I'm not sure where the moisture would come from?

I've put a few vehicles into long term storage (once 3 years, another 1 year plus) and each time the storage instructions were very clear on 1/4 tank of gas or less upon dropoff. And when I picked them up they were not full.
I think the 1/4 tank of gas storage instructions have to do with fire safety but nothing with what's best for keeping your bike in the best shape threw winter. I never put my bike away with anything less then a full tank of gas and my car I also rarerely park with less then a half tank of gas but most of the time even with 3/4. You never know when you need to flee your area and I don't wanna be one of those persons standing in a very long line before the gas station when the only thing you wanna do is get the hell out(we've all seen them on the news).
 

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Petrol does not burn, but the vapours do, making a full tank safer than a partially full one. Only when the vapours start to wain and the flame enters the tank with nowhere to expand to does it go from a flame to an explosion.
 

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Petrol does not burn, but the vapours do, making a full tank safer than a partially full one. Only when the vapours start to wain and the flame enters the tank with nowhere to expand to does it go from a flame to an explosion.
I can imagine that if a building that stores vehicles catches fire you rather have 10 bikes with a 1/4 tank of gas then 10 bikes with a full tank of gas so I think this is where the rule of 1/4 tank is for.
 

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I can imagine that if a building that stores vehicles catches fire you rather have 10 bikes with a 1/4 tank of gas then 10 bikes with a full tank of gas so I think this is where the rule of 1/4 tank is for.
Like you said, 'you can imagine' which in fairness that's what most folk might think as it seems logical but it's not really the case.
Granted, full tanks will burn for longer but would also give the fire department more time to smother the flames. 1/4 full and the time left to fight the fire is much less before the explosions start.
 

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I can imagine that if a building that stores vehicles catches fire you rather have 10 bikes with a 1/4 tank of gas then 10 bikes with a full tank of gas so I think this is where the rule of 1/4 tank is for.
I've been corrected once already in this thread but I'm fairly certain fire is not the reason for the 1/4 tank rule.
 

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Then I don't know what it is, but the more fuel there is in a tank, the less air there is above it, so also less water vapor to absorb. And if it does the concentration will stay as low as possible...
 
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