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Discussion Starter #1
i recently got myself a classic scrambler because i like the look of the wire-spokes. never mind the weight versus cast alloys wheels that most people here are advocating. anyway, i thought converting the wire wheels to run tubeless tires is the only issue i was going to tackle. i just remembered that on my push bikes (mtb), everytime i had a new wheel built, i had to have it re-aligned/trued and the spokes re-tightened after some riding. i'm almost 3,000 kms on the scrambler and got curious. so i propped it up on the rear stand, started the motor and ran it in first gear. lo and behold, there's a slight wobble on the rear wheel, a lateral displacement of approx. 3-5mm.

although the wobble is not felt while riding, there's no question that i have to take the bike for service. this is the first time i've owned a wire-wheel motorcycle so my questions are:
1) how far should the bike have been ridden (from factory) to let the spokes "settle" and have them re-tightened/ re-aligned?
2) how often do we need to have the spokes serviced?

thanks in advance
 

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I think the answer to both those questions depends upon a few different factors, like how well were the wheels assembled, how hard are they being ridden, how rough is the terrain they are used on, etc,etc,etc.
The tougher the use the more often the attention.

I have found that a rough means of checking spoke tension is to flick each spoke when cleaning them to see what tune they play, low notes =loose spokes, high notes = tight spokes.

At a pinch I've even used this method to tighten spokes on the run if need be, lift bike, deflate tyre, tighten spokes and true wheel, inflate tyre, bike down and on ya way.

In your case with bike still being under warranty, definitely a dealer service issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply, rider. Re-those factors: wheels were oem so i assume the assembly was according to ducati factory standards, whatever that means. I'm just an average rider, commuting to the office and perhaps a weekend ride or two, no hard riding, only on roads. My chicken strips are about an inch. I would've consulted the owner's manual but my dealer hasn't given it to me yet. There must be a recommended wire-wheel management for the average joe. Then just service wheels more often if you're more than average or do it less if you're less than the average rider.

Surprisingly when i asked the local dealer here in our country, they don't offer a wire-wheel service. Apparently, wire wheels are a new concept for them since they've only recently been selling ducati models with that wheel design like the scrambler and mts enduro

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi vincelp. Have you tried spinning your wire wheels on a stand? Are they still straight and true?

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Hi vincelp. Have you tried spinning your wire wheels on a stand? Are they still straight and true?
No, I didn't try that.
But, I sometimes look at the front wheel when riding and I can say there is no runout on this wheel.

Maybe, one day, I'll check it, but when there's too much runout, you feel it when riding and my bike has no strange behaviour now. So, no hurry for this.

Another way to check this is to put a metallic tool against the spokes, turn the wheel not too fast and hear carefully if they produce the same sound or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No, I didn't try that.
But, I sometimes look at the front wheel when riding and I can say there is no runout on this wheel.

Maybe, one day, I'll check it, but when there's too much runout, you feel it when riding and my bike has no strange behaviour now. So, no hurry for this.

Another way to check this is to put a metallic tool against the spokes, turn the wheel not too fast and hear carefully if they produce the same sound or not.
I've tried that, looking at the front wheel while riding and it "looks" ok. Believe me, spinning it while on a stand tells a different story.

Having watched the video rider posted and other related videos, i think checking for the sound the spokes make will only tell you how tight they are. Not really an indicator if they are straight and true? Please correct me if i'm wrong.

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I've tried that, looking at the front wheel while riding and it "looks" ok. Believe me, spinning it while on a stand tells a different story.
I know that, I've built myself a wire-spoked wheel on my XT.
Having watched the video rider posted and other related videos, i think checking for the sound the spokes make will only tell you how tight they are. Not really an indicator if they are straight and true? Please correct me if i'm wrong.
Yes, it tells you if they are straight and true, but if they are not, your wheel will have runout. A well-built wheel has all wires tightened the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Does anyone know what size or diameter and length of the wire spokes?

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